The Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to maximize telehealth’s ability to improve health outcomes, care delivery, and cost effectiveness.

CCHP Newsroom

  • Hospitals Turn to Telemedicine to Tackle ER Triage, Overcrowding

    mHealth Intelligence

    A telemedicine platform that helps emergency departments triage patients just might be the answer to crowded ERs and physician staffing issues.   The virtual visit platform, developed by the Wisconsin-based startup EmOpti, is currently being used in eight hospitals in four health systems: Wisconsin’s Aurora Health Care, MedStar in Washington D.C., Philadelphia’s Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals and Charlotte, N.C.-based Carolinas HealthCare.  In those hospitals, patients admitted to the ED who aren’t immediately seen by a doctor can be seen by secure video-conferencing technology by a doctor or physician assistant in a remote “command center.” The physician or PA examines the patient with the help of on-site triage nurses and can order tests or prescribe medications.

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  • Telemedicine Advocates Cry Foul Over FCC’s Net Neutrality Plan

    mHealth Intelligence

    Telehealth and telemedicine experts are warning that Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal to scrap net neutrality rules could seriously damage telehealth expansion in rural parts of the country and create a two-tiered system for telemedicine connectivity. “All hospitals consume huge amounts of bandwidth. All hospitals have wireless connectivity,” says Robert Annas, senior managing director at SOLIC Capital and chief operating officer for Eagle Telemedicine. “Limiting that is not the answer.” Pai has scheduled an FCC vote on December 14 to end net neutrality, which requires Internet Service Providers to allot the same bandwidth to all sites and prevents them from delaying, slowing or charging extra for bandwidth. “One aspect of this proposal I think is worth highlighting here is the flexibility it would give for prioritizing services that could make meaningful differences in the delivery of healthcare.,” he said in a Nov. 30 speech.” By ending the outright ban on paid prioritization, we hope to make it easier for consumers to benefit from services that need prioritization - such as latency-sensitive telemedicine.  Now, we can’t predict exactly which innovations entrepreneurs will come up with.  But by replacing an outright ban with a robust transparency requirement and FTC-led consumer protection, we will enable these services to come into being and help seniors.”

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  • TripleCare Expands SNF Telemedicine Services in Virginia

    Modern Healthcare

    Telemedicine provider TripleCare is expanding into to more skilled nursing and assisted living facilities.  For the first time, the company will have a presence in Virginia, where it's bringing its telemedicine services to Saber Healthcare Group's facilities. TripleCare already provides services to Saber skilled nursing facilities in Pennsylvania, which are among Saber's 105 facilities across six states.  "An increasing number of SNFs are recognizing that telemedicine can bring added physician services that help them avoid readmissions to hospitals by treating patients in place through virtual bedside visits," said TripleCare CEO Mary Jo Gorman. "In addition to this Saber relationship, we've seen our business grow significantly this past year."  The expansion into Virginia is set to be done by the end of the year.  TripleCare, based in New York City, has contracts with more than 60 skilled nursing facilities in 10 states. Each facility usually works with about four of TripleCare's 30 physicians, which the company says allows for continuity of care. These physicians are paid hourly, rather than on a fee-for-service basis.

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