The Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to maximize telehealth’s ability to improve health outcomes, care delivery, and cost effectiveness.

CCHP Newsroom

  • Where Teleneurology is Expanding, and who is Paying for it

    Neurology Today

    Technology-enabled physician visits and other telemedicine applications have long been snubbed by payers and burdened by a patchwork of state regulations. But as the health care value movement takes hold, those who kept telemedicine on the sidelines are beginning to see its charms.Indeed, 29 states have passed laws requiring private insurers to pay for telemedicine-delivered services in the same way they pay for in-person care, and 48 states provide some Medicaid coverage. And even Medicare, which has never been friendly to telemedicine, may be changing its attitude.“I guess I'm the most optimistic I've ever been in terms of the alignment between the [Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services] leadership with the intent of Congress to do something about this,” said Mario Gutierrez, executive director of the Center for Connected Health Policy, a national nonprofit organization that develops and advances telemedicine policies and resources.

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  • Michigan’s New Telehealth Law Requires Patient Consent

    mHealth Intelligence

    Michigan lawmakers have approved telehealth legislation that enables healthcare providers to use the technology with the patient's consent. S.B. 753, introduced in February by State Sen. Peter MacGregor, passed unanimously in the House on December 1 and in the Senate on December 6. It will become law in 90 days, making Michigan the latest state to set guidelines for telehealth. “This is a commonsense healthcare reform for a modern age,” MacGregor said following the bill’s passage. “Society has never been more connected, yet a patient’s ability to see a medical professional is becoming more and more constrained as hospital wait times grow. This bill would help improve access to care, which could lead to healthier patient outcomes.”  “Telehealth could transform healthcare in Michigan,” MacGregor added, noting the bill had been supported by groups including the Michigan Association of Health Plans, the Michigan Council of Nurse Practitioners, Spectrum Health and Ascension Michigan. “It allows healthcare professionals to extend their reach beyond a corner office to meet patients where they are. It enhances access to and use of healthcare in our state, reduces costs, encourages competition and, most importantly, could lead to healthier lives.”

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  • Telehealth Can Work for Veterans Dealing With Depression

    mHealth Intelligence

    Veterans dealing with depression can be treated just as well with telehealth as with in-person care, according to a recent study. Studying more than 200 senior-aged veterans for one year between 2007 and 2011, researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina and other institutions found “little of no meaningful difference” in symptoms or patient satisfaction between care delivered in a clinician’s office and that delivered via video. The one difference lies in convenience, especially for elderly veterans. “Based on results of this study and prior research, telemedicine is a highly relevant option to address the needs of rural patients or those living in remote locations, while providing patient satisfaction and quality of life similar to that provided by in-person treatment delivered at clinics,” Leonard Egede, MD, director of the MUSC Center for Health Disparities Research, a VA physician and the lead author of the study, told Reuters. Engede and his team followed 241 veterans over the course of a year, randomly assigning some of the them to eight weeks of in-person counseling and others to counseling via phone and video monitor.

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