The Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to maximize telehealth’s ability to improve health outcomes, care delivery, and cost effectiveness.

CCHP Newsroom

  • One in Five Consumers Would Switch to a Doctor that Offers Telehealth Visits

    PR Newswire

    American Well, the leading telehealth company and partner to more than 70 U.S. health systems, today released the results of its Telehealth Index: 2017 Consumer Survey which found that 20 percent  of consumers would switch their current primary care provider (PCP) if another PCP in their area offered telehealth visits, among other findings. American Well commissioned Harris Poll to conduct two surveys online in late 2016 to measure consumer perceptions and experiences with telehealth. Among those who have a PCP, 65 percent are interested in seeing their PCP over video. Parents with children under 18 are even more likely to say they're interested, with 74 percent interested in seeing their PCP through telehealth. 20 percent of consumers are willing to switch to a PCP that does offer telemedicine visits."Consumers are clearly interested in more convenient access to healthcare – and increasingly, they are even willing to switch providers to get internet video service. Not only that, but consumers are willing to try telehealth for many needs – from chronic conditions to post-discharge follow up," said Mary Modahl, Chief Marketing Officer, American Well. "Health systems and provider groups must take note; if you haven't already, 2017 is the year to put a secure telehealth platform in place." 

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  • Telehealth in New Jersey Hindered By a Lack of Awareness

    mHealth Intelligence

    Healthcare providers looking to launch a telehealth platform should be reminded to first make sure their potential patients know what it is and what it can do. That’s the dilemma facing New Jersey lawmakers, who are grappling with new legislation to regulate telehealth even as a recent survey finds that most New Jersey residents have never used it. Conducted by the New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute (NJHCQI) and Rutgers University’s Eagleton Center for Public Interest Polling, the recent survey of some 772 New Jersey residents found that only 16 percent have received healthcare through telehealth. And while a majority of residents surveyed say they would be comfortable using telehealth for some services, like prescription refills or an online consult to see if an in-person visit is warranted, they’re less willing to use an online platform to address an urgent medical condition – 62 percent were either “not very comfortable” or “not comfortable at all” with using telehealth for emergency care. They were also evenly split on using telehealth for therapy or counseling, and only 53 percent were very or somewhat comfortable with sending and receiving personal health information via telehealth. 

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  • Small Hospitals Turn to Telemedicine for ER Services

    mHealth Intelligence

    A small hospital on Prince Edward Island may turn to telemedicine to keep its emergency department open 24 hours a day. Officials with Health PEI, Prince Edward Island’s island-wide health system, are discussing a virtual visit platform for Kings County Memorial Hospital, a 30-bed community hospital in Montague. The hospital was forced to reduce its emergency room hours to 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. last year. That decision didn’t sit well with local residents. Last July, Montague’s town council voted to support a local businessman’s bid to launch a telemedicine pilot at the hospital. "The technology is available, is well-proven, we're not re-inventing the wheel," Ray Brown told CBC News, estimating the project would cost $20,000 to $28,000. "We're simply taking the best of technology that is available elsewhere in the world. If you become sick on the space station, you're seen immediately by a doctor via telemedicine … I'd like to see the same services here in Montague." Many small and rural hospitals across North America are struggling to stay afloat, facing competition from consumer-facing online telehealth platforms, retail health and urgent care clinics. Just this month, St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital in Cornwall, N.Y. and Baptist Hospital in Orange, Calif., shut down its emergency department due to a decline in business. 

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